Monthly Archives: June 2020

Spotlight on Jumio

1. What is the mission and vision of Jumio?

Jumio’s mission is to make the internet a safer place by protecting the ecosystems of businesses through cutting-edge online identity verification and authentication services that quickly and accurately connect a person’s online and real-world identities. Jumio’s automated identity verification solutions fight fraud, maintain compliance and onboard new customers faster.

2.  Why is trustworthy digital identity critical for existing and emerging markets?

As more Canadians turn to their computers and smartphones to manage their money (and every other aspect of their lives), it’s important for organizations across a broad span of industries to provide a seamless digital experience, and that starts with the onboarding process. Consumers expect the ability to create online accounts in minutes, not days — anytime, anywhere. They aren’t afraid to take their business elsewhere if they encounter unnecessary friction. In fact more than 40 per cent of potential new accounts are sacrificed during the onboarding process because of time-consuming, clunky identity verification processes.

3.  How will digital identity transform the Canadian and global economy? How does Jumio address challenges associated with this transformation?

As companies evolve to become more digital, more and more interactions with customers will occur on a screen rather than in person. These digital transformation efforts start with creating new accounts online. Digital identity verification is an unsung hero in an organization’s digital transformation strategy because companies must verify that a person’s digital identity matches their physical identity when conducting business online. 

With this in mind, it’s imperative for Canadian enterprises to build in the necessary operational resiliency to survive this new reality. The COVID-19 pandemic has showcased the value of IT and digital transformation, and the need for organizations to accelerate the transition.

According to a recent J.D. Power study, nearly one-third (31 per cent) of new account openings are executed through a bank website or mobile app, up from 22 per cent in 2019. Meanwhile, the number of new account openings at branches has declined year over year by 10 per cent, and now comprises just over half of all new account openings. Sadly, many financial institutions still require users to visit a store or branch office to create a new account or to perform routine transactions — increasingly, this is going to be a difficult mandate as many of us are now homebound and social distancing.

This is a wake-up call for organizations that have placed too much focus on daily operational needs at the expense of investing in digital business and long-term resilience. Jumio helps Canadian businesses to digitally transform their KYC/AML and onboarding processes so they can quickly, securely and compliantly onboard new customers.

4. What role does Canada have to play as a leader in the space?

Canada is playing a leading role in online identity verification in a somewhat surprising way. In recent years, Montreal has emerged as a major technology hub for artificial intelligence (AI) due to the prominence of AI talent and research support in the city. This has allowed a number of companies, including Jumio, to launch AI labs in Montreal. In Jumio’s case, our goal is to build production AI models that perform three vital functions related to online identity verification: data extraction, fraud detection and risk scoring. In fact, AI has already been productionalized to reduce the time it takes to verify the digital identities of remote users. At Jumio, AI models have reduced the average customer transaction time by more than 50 per cent, with more significant reductions planned in 2020.  

So, in effect, Canada is driving the AI-based innovation that is powering faster and more accurate online identity verifications around the globe.

5.  Why did Jumio join the DIACC?

Jumio joined the DIACC because we wanted to be part of the conversation and help shape the emerging digital identity ecosystem. Jumio is a global leader in AI-based identity verification and biometric-based authentication and we process close to 300,000 identity verifications each day. As a result of our experience, we have much to offer in terms of best practices, especially given the pioneering work of our AI Labs division based in Montreal. At the same time, we want to learn from other members about best practices and emerging frameworks for digital identification and authentication.

We share DIACC’s mission of enabling Canadians to completely and securely participate in the global digital economy by establishing a robust, secure, scalable, inclusive and privacy-enhancing digital ecosystem. Our industry is evolving quickly and many institutions are relying on yesterday’s technologies, including knowledge-based verification and credit bureau queries which offer low levels of identity assurance and open the door to impersonation fraud and account takeovers. We are playing a valuable role in helping Canadian enterprises, of all stripes, understand the key trade-offs they need to consider and help them adopt more modern, AI-based approaches to digital identity verification and authentication.

6.  What else should we know about Jumio?

Jumio is the global leader in online identity verification because of our commitment to innovation and the customer experience. Jumio leverages a unique combination of technologies including AI, OCR, computer vision, machine learning and leading-edge biometrics to set the industry benchmark for identity verification accuracy, fraud deterrence and simplified KYC/AML compliance. Moreover, Jumio has spent the last five years refining and innovating around the customer experience. This includes reducing the number of steps required to verify an ID document or identity. This also includes optimizing the language and graphics used on screen to help maximize online conversions. These types of innovations are no less significant and help our business customers streamline their customer’s online journey.   

Jumio has verified more than 250 million identities issued by over 200 countries and territories from real-time web and mobile transactions. Jumio’s solutions are used by leading companies in the financial services, sharing economy, digital currency, retail, travel and online gaming sectors. Based in Palo Alto, Jumio operates globally with offices in North America, Latin America, Europe and Asia Pacific and has been the recipient of numerous awards for innovation.

DIACC Women in ID: Government Services

To build Canada’s digital future, every Canadian needs a seat at the table. DIACC is fortunate to have members from both the public and private sectors, all of whom are working together at the forefront of digital identity. 

We’re connecting with DIACC member Women in Identity to learn how they have navigated industry challenges and get career advice for the next generation. In this article, we hear perspectives from British Columbia (BC) to New Brunswick and in between. These are some of the leaders who are shaping service delivery for Canadians, and driving change across the industry.

Molding Young Minds 

There is a gender divide within the tech sector – in Canada and beyond. How can we encourage more young women to pursue these careers? 

More emphasis on competencies required rather than the technical infrastructure could help, Sophia Howse, Executive Director, BC’s Provincial Identity Information Management Program with the Province of BC, explained. “If we could communicate how skills such as leadership, collaboration, critical thinking and problem solving can be applied in the space, then I feel we would attract more interest from women.” 

CJ Ritchie, Associate Deputy Minister and Government Chief Information Officer for the Province of BC, and member of the DIACC Board of Directors, noted that it’s important to adapt leadership styles to industry contexts and to individual team members. “Mature leaders don’t try to manage everybody or manage everybody the same. Make room for specificity and diversity and bring on a team that’s smarter than you. Don’t be afraid to not be the smartest person in the room – it’s a sign you’re doing it right.”

“Make room for specificity and diversity and bring on a team that’s smarter than you. Don’t be afraid to not be the smartest person in the room – it’s a sign you’re doing it right.”

CJ Ritchie, Associate Deputy Minister and Government Chief Information Officer for the Province of BC

Sharing sector opportunities with young women during school years is key, emphasized Colleen Boldon, Director, Digital Lab and Digital ID Programs, Public Services and Smart Government at Service New Brunswick, and member of the DIACC Board of Directors. “Women need mentors, career advancement opportunities and meaningful work,” she said. “I think the one distinction that still exists today is that men more often ask for help and advancement opportunities, while women are more inclined to try to do things on their own, take another course and hope that someone notices their work and promotes them.” 

Kathleen Fraser, Manager of Digital Identity for Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, echoed the need for a broader view of what it means to work in tech that demonstrates the difference it can make in the lives of Canadians. She explained, “For myself, I take great pride in the work I do because I feel a great desire to make a difference in people’s lives and for the clients who are interacting with us.”

“Saying ‘yes’ to complex assignments and being comfortable in the ‘not knowing’ space offers a challenging work environment that can pave the way to a very challenging and rewarding career”

Sophia Howse, Executive Director, BC’s Provincial Identity Information Management Program with the Province of BC

Women Encouraging Women

Technology doesn’t have to be intimidating or highly technical, pointed out Cosanna Preston-Idedia, Director of Digital Identity for the Government of Saskatchewan. “Whoever you are, dig into your passions and spend time understanding how tech is impacting, shaping and changing that space,” she said. “If the actual technical details are not for you, look to the concepts, outcomes and impacts that it has to offer.”

To help other women achieve a more prominent role in their organizations, she emphasized taking time to lift others up. This could involve concluding meetings with a roundtable discussion, serving as a mentor or coach, and offering public praise and private feedback. 

“Whoever you are, dig into your passions and spend time understanding how tech is impacting, shaping and changing that space.”

Cosanna Preston-Idedia, Director of Digital Identity for the Government of Saskatchewan.

Drawing inspiration from her own mentors, Fraser believes a growth mindset and community as essential for success. “Never stop learning and build a network of people with a similar vision,” she said. “The kind of work we’re doing right now cannot be done in a silo. It has to be done in collaboration with other people.”

Howse advises becoming more comfortable with the unknown. “I have learned that saying ‘yes’ to complex assignments and being comfortable in the ‘not knowing’ space offers a challenging work environment that can pave the way to a very challenging and rewarding career,” she said. For instance, encouraging team members to present their work to a larger audience boosts confidence and builds profile. 

In Ritchie’s experience, understanding how to attenuate her leadership style to the culture she found herself in became a source of strength. “It was a turning point learning to use that to my advantage rather than letting it be a barrier to me,” she explained. Differences in how she was perceived in new roles and industries became less personal. “Learning that that was an external force that had nothing to do with me and attenuating my style to have a better impact on my reputation and corporate currency,” she said. 

“For myself, I take great pride in the work I do because I feel a great desire to make a difference in people’s lives and for the clients who are interacting with us.”

Kathleen Fraser, Manager of Digital Identity for Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada,

Challenges and the Road Ahead

“There are more CEOs today named John than there are female CEOs. That should tell you something,” Ritchie reflected on the state of the landscape. “Snapshots in time can fool you into thinking we’ve made progress – but I’m not sure that’s true.” 

To get ahead and persevere, even when often one of the only women in the room, Fraser focuses on the huge potential for change. “I think you need to have passion and a sense of leadership that allows you to be a disruptor,” she explains. “That is what we’re doing – we’re disruptors in the space when we look at new ways of doing things. When you have conviction in your vision… you don’t stop at the first sign of failure.” 

Boldon chooses to focus on the things she can control – her work and the challenge ahead. ”My story looks very similar to other woman who chose non-traditional careers for our generation, and experienced discrimination and setbacks, while pushing career and societal boundaries on what a good wife and mother should be,” she said. 

Her advice? “Enjoy the ride. There are more opportunities for women in IT [Information Technology] than ever before and it is an ever-evolving, fascinating sector where you can find meaningful work, wonderful colleagues and a great career.”

“Enjoy the ride. There are more opportunities for women in IT than ever before and it is an ever-evolving, fascinating sector where you can find meaningful work, wonderful colleagues and a great career.”

Colleen Boldon, Director, Digital Lab and Digital ID Programs, Public Services and Smart Government at Service New Brunswick

Do not fear the words technical or technology, added Howse. Understand your skillset and lean into your strengths, all while continuing to develop yourself. 

Ritchie agrees that diving in and going for your goals is important, especially as women are more likely to limit themselves to roles and opportunities they believe they are 100 per cent qualified for. “Don’t feel you need to have it all figured out,” she shared. “You can build the bridge as you walk on it. You only need to know the next right step to take… You’re capable of far more than you think.”

Meet more leading female DIACC members in digital identity

As Digital ID Takes Centre Stage in Canada, the DIACC Elects a Strong Slate of Directors at the 2020 AGM

Canada, June 18, 2020 – The Digital Identification and Authentication Council of Canada, (DIACC) today announced the appointment of five (5) nominees to the five Director seats that were up for election at its Annual General Meeting held virtually on June 16, 2020. 

“Now more than ever, Canadians need to perform transactions digitally and DIACC members and collaborative partners are leading the way. We are pleased to congratulate each nominee who was duly elected through our virtual annual general meeting,” said Joni Brennan, President, DIACC.”

“These individuals, and their respective organizations, are making a significant investment in a digital Canada. DIACC members have the experience and leadership needed to deliver the economic benefits focused Pan-Canadian Trust Framework and related DIACC innovation and outreach initiatives,” said Dave Nikolejsin, Chair of the DIACC Board.

The 2020 DIACC electoral slate:

  • Dave Nikolejsin, Independent & current DIACC Board Chair
  • Franklin Garrigues, Vice President Digital Channels, Mobile for Everyone, TD Bank & current Board Vice-Chair
  • Patrice Dagenais, Vice president, Payment and Business Partnerships for Desjardins Cards Services (DCS), Desjardins
  • Susie De Franco, General Manager Digital Channel & Products, Canada Post
  • Hugh McKee, Head of BMO Partners, BMO

DIACC Directors are elected industry leaders who set the organizational strategic directions, and ensure good governance is practiced, ensuring policies and procedures are continually improved and align with the vision and representation of DIACC membership. The DIACC Board members are: 

  • Dave Nikolejsin, Independent & Board Chair
  • Franklin Garrigues, Vice President Digital Channels, Mobile for Everyone, TD Bank & Board Vice-Chair
  • Andre Boysen, Chief Identity Officer, SecureKey & Board Treasurer
  • Colleen Boldon Director, Digital Lab and Digital ID Programs, Public Services and Smart Government, Province of New Brunswick
  • Marc Brouillard, Interim Chief Information Officer, Government of Canada
  • Neil Butters, Head, Digital Identity Innovation & New Ventures, Interac Corp.
  • Susie De Franco, General Manager Digital Channel & Products, Canada Post
  • Patrice Dagenais, Vice president, Payment and Business Partnerships for Desjardins Cards Services (DCS)
  • Robert Devries Assistant Deputy Minister, Enterprise Digital Services Integration Division, Ministry of Government and Consumer Services, Government of Ontario
  • Greg Elcich, Vice President of Innovation for CIBC
  • Allan Foster, ForgeRock, Chief Evangelist
  • Louis Jacob, Vice President, Core Engineering and Transformation at Manulife
  • Hugh McKee, BMO, Head of BMO Partners
  • CJ Ritchie, Associate Deputy Minister and Government Chief Information Officer, Province of BC
  • Eros Spadotto, Executive Vice-President, Technology Strategy, TELUS

About the Digital ID and Authentication Council of Canada

The Digital Identification and Authentication Council of Canada (DIACC) is the non-profit coalition of public and private sector leaders who are developing Canada’s system for digital identification and authentication to enable Canadians’ full and secure participation in the global digital economy. DIACC leverages broad Pan-Canadian and International input to collaboratively develop and publish the Pan-Canadian Trust Framework and other resources to secure public and private sector interoperability and advance the delivery of Canada’s Digital Identity Ecosystem.

Spotlight on Folio Technologies

1. What is the mission and vision of Folio?

We are in business to enable everyone to manage their own identity by building the most trusted mobile identity platform. We have a real opportunity to transform digital identity to be as convenient and accessible as it is secure and trustworthy:

  • Make securing digital credentials on a smartphone the new normal
  • Enable absolute privacy for every user in every situation
  • Establish an open, digital identity ecosystem
  • Provide an inclusive and accessible platform, free to the user
  • Lead the innovation of biometrics and AI to eradicate identity fraud

2.  Why is trustworthy digital identity critical for existing and emerging markets?

Digital trust will be crucial across the economy as now, more than ever, people need to be able to prove their identity and their status remotely.  

But digital and ‘trust’ don’t always marry well in people’s minds. Now with everything ‘going digital’ at a blistering rate, the individual needs to be in control – if they don’t trust, if they can’t access and feel secure… digital identity becomes a burden and a threat.

3.  How will digital identity transform the Canadian and global economy? How does Folio address challenges associated with this transformation?

Digital identity has the capacity to increase inclusion, citizen participation, and access to critical services for all. Rather than waiting 2 weeks for a face-to-face appointment with a local government department or driving 2 hours to the nearest bank, digital identity will allow all Canadians to prove who they are at the click of a button and unlock a wealth of sensitive and high-value services. We live in a connected world but the ability to prove your identity in that remote context has been slow to catch up. It’s time that we enable the same “contract of trust” that can be achieved in a face-to-face encounter but in a digital context.

At Folio, we believe all citizens should have choice and ownership of how they manage their identity, always taking active steps to build consent-driven, privacy-preserving solutions that nonetheless do not compromise on usability and experience. The self-sovereign, decentralised models will only thrive when the infrastructure suits the market and as such puts the citizen at the very centre of the ecosystem. Using Folio will allow Canadian citizens to register for a multi-purpose digital wallet, storing their credentials there and using them for an expanding set of services, private and public.

4. What role does Canada have to play as a leader in the space?

Canada is already contributing meaningfully to the global dialogue on digital identity, with DIACC facilitating debate, engagement and progress on critical pieces of infrastructure like standards and frameworks like the Pan Canadian Trust Framework (PCTF) that will enable decentralized digital identity and pave the way for international interoperability. Most importantly it’s the citizens themselves who are engaged and that is the most important stakeholder group. As the DIACC 2019 survey testified, 70 per cent of Canadians are ready to embrace digital identity as a means to improved inclusion and remote access to critical services. The expertise and know-how is there with exciting tech hubs across the provinces, regional governments approaching the topic with cautious optimism, and DIACC providing the forum and nurturing the dialogue between these stakeholder groups. It feels like Canada could be on the cusp of something exciting.

5.  Why did Folio join the DIACC?

Digital identity requires collaboration and Folio is committed to participate in the local and international communities that will be driving the development and adoption of technology innovation in this fast-moving space. DIACC represents a diverse cross section of public and private sector stakeholders who will help Folio understand the localised opportunities and participate in the development of the PCTF for best practice and interoperability. 

6.  What else should we know about Folio?

Folio Technologies (Folio) is HQ’d in London, operates globally and is part of the wider SGO Group. SGO is committed to innovative companies that demonstrate long-term promise in areas that enhance lives especially in the key areas of:

  • Identity, Health Passports and Privacy (Folio)
  • Democracy and citizen participation (e.g. Smartmatic)

SGO is built on the extraordinary success of Smartmatic, which leads the electronic voting industry in terms of revenue, profitability, geographical presence, innovation and quality of support services. SGO is headquartered in London.

Request for Comment and IPR Review: PCTF Credentials (Relationships & Attributes) Draft Recommendations V1.0

STATUS: This review is now closed. Thank you for your participation!

Notice of Intent: DIACC is collaborating to develop and publish a Credentials (Relationships & Attributes) industry standard as a component of the Pan-Canadian Trust Framework (PCTF) to set a baseline of public and private sector interoperability of identity services and solutions.

To learn more about the Pan-Canadian vision and benefits-for-all value proposition please review the Pan-Canadian Trust Framework Overview.

Document Status: These review documents have been approved as Draft Recommendations V1.0 by the DIACC’s Trust Framework Expert Committee (TFEC) that operates under the DIACC controlling policies.

Summary: This component specifies conformance criteria that Digital Identity Ecosystem Participants can use to assess the degree to which the ecosystem protects the use of digital Credentials. The scope of this component includes features of the digital Credential lifecycle and focuses on ensuring transparency and auditability as the primary methods for building trust across the Entities involved. Additional information can be found in the Component Overview linked below.

Invitation: All interested parties are invited to comment.

Period: Opens: June 1, 2020 at 23:59 PST | Closes: July 2, 2020 at 23:59 PST

Document: PCTF Credentials (Relationships & Attributes)

When reviewing this draft, consider the following and note that responses to these questions are non-binding and serve to improve the PCTF.

  1. The purpose of this component is to describe processes related to attributes and relationships. Is that sufficiently clear throughout the document?
  2. Is the title of this component sufficiently reflective of its contents?
  3. Are the attributes and relationships processes clearly explained?
  4. Is the distinction between the Define Attribute process, which describes a type or class of Attribute, and the Bind Attribute process, which describes the creation of an instance of an Attribute, sufficiently clear?
  5. Is the distinction between the Define Relationship process, which describes a type or class of Relationship, and the Declare Relationship process, which describes the creation of an instance of a Relationship, sufficiently clear?

Intellectual Property Rights: Comments must be received within the 30-day comment period noted above. All comments are subject to the DIACC contributor agreement; by submitting a comment you agree to be bound by the terms and conditions therein. DIACC Members are also subject to the Intellectual Property Rights Policy. Any notice of an intent not to license under either the Contributor Agreement and/or the Intellectual Property Rights Policy with respect to the review documents or any comments must be made at the Contributor’s and/or Member’s earliest opportunity, and in any event, within the 30-day comment period. IPR claims may be sent to review@diacc.ca. Please include “IPR Claim” as the subject.

Process:

  • All comments are subject to the DIACC contributor agreement.
  • Submit comments using the provided DIACC Comment Submission Spreadsheet.
  • Reference the draft and corresponding line number for each comment submitted.
  • Email completed DIACC Comment Submission Spreadsheet to review@diacc.ca.
  • Questions may be sent to review@diacc.ca.

Value to Canadians: The PCTF Credentials (Relationships & Attributes) Component will provide value to all Canadians, businesses, and governments by setting a baseline of business, legal, and technical interoperability. The DIACC’s mandate is to collaboratively develop and deliver resources to help Canadian’s to digitally transact with security, privacy, and convenience. The PCTF is one such resource that represents a collection of industry standards, best practices, and other resources that help to establish interoperability of an ecosystem of identity services and solutions. The DIACC is a not-for-profit coalition of members from the public and private sector who are making a significant and sustained investment in accelerating Canada’s Identity Ecosystem.

Context: The purpose of this Draft Recommendation review is to ensure transparency in the development and diversity of a truly Pan-Canadian, and international, input. In alignment with our Principles for an Identity Ecosystem, processes to respect and enhance privacy are being prioritized through every step of the PCTF development process.

DIACC expects to modify and improve these Draft Recommendations based upon public comments. Comments made during the review will be considered for incorporation into the next drafts and DIACC will prepare a Disposition of Comments to provide transparency with regard to how each comment was handled.  

Thank you for your support and participation in this review period.